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Admittedly we have very little in the way of experience thus far (still under 500 miles on the XLR), but we have done interstate highway travel, been around tall buildings, made plenty of turns and cruised along valleys on rural roads here in North Carolina and the XM reception has been absolutely superb. We especially enjoy channel 60 Classic Soul (really, for the most part, old rhythm and blues) and channel 101 Reggae.

We decided to install the XM antenna ourselves since we were concerned the dealership would not be as careful about the matter as we would like. Here are a couple of “tips” for those similarly inclined. We bought new drill bits so the holes would be cut as cleanly as possible and we also bought the special masking tape used just for painting cars (don’t even consider the normal variety of masking tape). The tape is used to prevent tearing of the paint and fiberglass when the final holes are drilled from the topside, after the pilot holes have been drilled from the underside of the trunk lid. We also suggest wrapping a good bit of narrow tape around the base of the drill bit so the drill chuck can’t accidentally come in contact with the trunk lid when the bit bores through it.

The instructions, as usual, leave a little bit to be desired. For example, there’s no warning that when removing the push-in retainers from the “rear compartment trim panel on the rear compartment lid” there’s a need to support the panel more or less in place and when the last retainer has been removed to lower it only enough to reach inside. Why is that important? Because on the top side of the panel are wires on either side which have been hot glued in spots and it’s necessary to reach and disconnect two wiring connectors before the panel can be fully removed without tearing the glue and the wires loose. That was lots of fun (we suggest two sets of hands).

There’s an “arrow” template included in the kit that has to be positioned in a matching recessed area beneath the trunk lid. This template, among other things, is used to mark where the pilot holes are to be drilled. The matching recessed area is noticeably larger than the template. Apart from the obvious need to carefully center the template across the width of the recess there’s the not so obvious need to move it as far forward as possible (arrow tip end) in the recess. Failure to do so can cause the antenna ultimately to be mounted too far to the rear which puts it on the raised center line of the trunk and the base of the antenna will not sit flush against the top of the trunk lid. That half-inch of play in the recess can make a lot of difference. You would think the instructions would address this matter, but they don’t.

So, there are a few tips for the do it yourselfers out there.

Happy listening.

Best regards,
Ed and Sandra
 

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And if you would like to receive XM in your garage and for that matter have it easily distributed anywhere else in your house, we would suggest this product:

http://www.myradiostore.com/antennas-cables/xm-signal-distribution/sa10116-xm-signal-repeater.html

You can actually see it mounted at the top left of the window in this photo:



The XM satellite antenna which feeds it is mounted outside the window. This was an ideal solution for us because we have a PolkAudio XRt12 Reference Tuner tied into the home entertainment system situated in the Great Room and we didn’t have to run any wires to get a very high quality signal to it.

http://www.polkaudio.com/homeaudio/products/xrt12/

Guess our listening perception isn’t as acute as that of some others because we think the XM quality is pretty good, both in the XLR and with the home receiver. We also have Sirius and frankly can’t tell a difference in the quality.

Best regards,
Ed and Sandra
 

· Banned
Joined
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163 Posts
The following is an excerpt from a post we did almost precisely two years ago that might be helpful in a small way for folk considering installing the regular XLR XM antenna on the trunk or otherwise working with the leads in the trunk lid:

We decided to install the XM antenna ourselves since we were concerned the dealership would not be as careful about the matter as we would like. Here are a couple of “tips” for those similarly inclined. We bought new drill bits so the holes would be cut as cleanly as possible and we also bought the special masking tape used just for painting cars (don’t even consider the normal variety of masking tape). The tape is used to prevent tearing of the paint and fiberglass when the final holes are drilled from the topside, after the pilot holes have been drilled from the underside of the trunk lid. We also suggest wrapping a good bit of narrow tape around the base of the drill bit so the drill chuck can’t accidentally come in contact with the trunk lid when the bit bores through it.

The instructions, as usual, leave a little bit to be desired. For example, there’s no warning that when removing the push-in retainers from the “rear compartment trim panel on the rear compartment lid” there’s a need to support the panel more or less in place and when the last retainer has been removed to lower it only enough to reach inside. Why is that important? Because on the top side of the panel are wires on either side which have been hot glued in spots and it’s necessary to reach and disconnect two wiring connectors before the panel can be fully removed without tearing the glue and the wires loose. That was lots of fun (we suggest two sets of hands).

There’s an “arrow” template included in the kit that has to be positioned in a matching recessed area beneath the trunk lid. This template, among other things, is used to mark where the pilot holes are to be drilled. The matching recessed area is noticeably larger than the template. Apart from the obvious need to carefully center the template across the width of the recess there’s the not so obvious need to move it as far forward as possible (arrow tip end) in the recess. Failure to do so can cause the antenna ultimately to be mounted too far to the rear which puts it on the raised center line of the trunk and the base of the antenna will not sit flush against the top of the trunk lid. That half-inch of play in the recess can make a lot of difference. You would think the instructions would address this matter, but they don’t.

So, there are a few tips for the do it yourselfers out there.

Happy listening.

Best regards,
Ed and Sandra
 
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