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Is there a trick to replacing a burned out bulb for the License plate illumination other than what I see as removal of the carpet cover on trunk lid to expose the bulb and socket. Looks like it could take a good hr or two and a real pain in the backside for a simplr bulb replacement
 

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Is there a trick to replacing a burned out bulb for the License plate illumination other than what I see as removal of the carpet cover on trunk lid to expose the bulb and socket. Looks like it could take a good hr or two and a real pain in the backside for a simplr bulb replacement
It takes me about 5 mins, needs (better with) two people though. Just pull all those retainers out and have somebody hold one side as you do the other side, it isn't heavy but is clumsy. There might be a connector or two to undo (the trunk close switch pulls down and out) before the whole thing drops. You then have to shift a number (but not all of them) of 10mm nuts too. I use a short step ladder to reach the lamp cluster assembly as the open trunk is so high. There is enough slack in the loom to lift the unit up and then rotate it so it sits up there with the lamp holders on view. I forget where the number plate lamps are though, maybe you don't need to take the center assembly off.

Putting it back you have to align the holder for the trunk close switch. Not difficult but needs a modicum of care.

I know I can put it back single handed by somehow balancing the thing on a couple of metal brackets as I get a retainer in quick. (I had a reversing lamp go out, the whole glass envelope simply fell off the lamp, I used a vaccum to fetch it out of the inside of the unit.)

PS, pulling out those retainers. I do have the correct tool for this and it works. In fact, I have two tools for this. One fancy looking affair that has a sort of parallel action and a much simpler (and cheaper) thing that looks a bit like a screwdriver with a wide 'V' blade and a compound (or 'S' shaped) bend. The second tool is much better than the first one for most all circumstances. Ah well.
 
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