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If you've ever wanted to do any work on your XLR that requires jacking it up (for example, painting the calipers, changing or cleaning the wheels, etc.) then you should know how to do so properly. Even if you have a service center or Cadillac dealer do your work for you there is still a risk of damaging the suspension, frame or perhaps cracking the rocker panels if they don't do it correctly. And we all know how lacking in knowledge many dealers and others are when it comes to servicing XLR's.

Unfortunately, the XLR owner's manual isn't much help. It indicates that a jack should be placed under suspension points located in the front and and rear of the car. Because the XLR is so low you should use a racing jack to properly access these support points. But even if you do so, you are placing a great deal of stress on the suspension and, further, it isn't clear as to where to place jack stands if you are going to be working on the car for an extended period of time or if you need to have more than one wheel off the ground at a time.

What many people don't realize is that the XLR frame is the same as that used on the C6 Corvette. Along the bottom of the frame inside the rocker panels on each side of the car are two slots (front and rear) which are put there for the purpose of inserting jacking pads. Once inserted, the car can be safely raised using a racing jack placed under the jacking pads from the side of the car without damaging the rocker panel or putting unnecessary stress on the suspension. Most knowledgeable dealers (certainly most Corvette dealers) use jacking pads when it is necessary to have the wheels hang freely for removal.

If you'd like to learn more about this or if you'd like to acquire a set of jacking pads so that you have them when you or others work on your car, you can contact Jeff at Elite Engineering, LLC. His website is www.eliteengineeringusa.com For the modest cost involved it's cheap insurance against damaging your beautiful XLR.
 

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Along the bottom of the frame inside the rocker panels on each side of the car are two slots (front and rear) which are put there for the purpose of inserting jacking pads.
Just a small point of detail; those are where they lift and carry the frame along with most of the vehicle at the factory. They work fine as a lifting point and the puck prevents the jack or lift from damaging the rocker panel as you described, because it is bonded to the bottom of the frame rail. However they were never designed as a lift point (especially as a single lift point for one wheel) although I do that often enough myself. The manual doesn't mention those as a jack point because they aren't actually... just handy and probably harmless.

 

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I had my X in the shop today getting my headlights done for the 4th time, long story of incompetence, and thought my tech had a pretty good idea. He uses 4 chunks of 2x4 which go on top of the lift points. These then press up against the frame so that the plate doesn't contact the body.

Of course a lift has benefits those of us playing in the garage don't. Ed and Sandra excluded... He actually set the blocks in where the frame starts to curve up at each end. It balanced very nicely and worked well.

Paul
 
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