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Dashboard screen internet access?

Some of their information is correct, long before the XLR ever came out the Sound system was orginally designed to have internet access. It was called the Infotainment System.

The system was designed to have internet access, but there were some issues nation wide with people getting into accidents with DVDs playing onscreen with various makes and models of cars. Many states passed laws not allowing viewing of movinig images, other than navigation maps. At this point it was decided, a few years before the XLR actually hit the streets (2000/2001 time frame) that email and internet access was not the responsible to have while driving.

www.Cadillac-XLR.com

Thank you
Allen
 
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I don't believe any of their information is correct since it was never implemented. Obviously this is an old ad and they added the V information without updating their old information. Responsible journalism should be a first priority.
Thank you.
Bob
 

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Mr XLR said:
Some of their information is correct, long before the XLR ever came out the Sound system was orginally designed to have internet access. It was called the Infotainment System.

The system was designed to have internet access, but there were some issues nation wide with people getting into accidents with DVDs playing onscreen with various makes and models of cars. Many states passed laws not allowing viewing of movinig images, other than navigation maps. At this point it was decided, a few years before the XLR actually hit the streets (2000/2001 time frame) that email and internet access was not the responsible to have while driving.

www.Cadillac-XLR.com

Thank you
Allen
Allen,

It seems that GM's thinking was way ahead of their time back then. Too bad some of their conceptual thinking didn't flow into the final design.

I am not high on the concept of watching DVDs while I drive but it certainly seems that the GM navigation system is the most restrictive of others on the road. You can virtually do nothing with the navigation system while you are in motion except for the limited use of the voice recognition system that is nearly worthless.

If you want to learn about a navigation system that is functional, extremely easy to use, allowing fast data entry, and -- and this is the good part -- it can be utilized while the car is in motion, then go to your nearest friendly Acura dealer and request to drive an Acura RL. My wife drives such a car (I will not give up my XLR) but I'm just amazed at how different the navigation system functionality is versus anything in the GM lineup. Honda must have different lawyers that went to different liability schools.

Bill
 

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XLRcited said:
Allen,

It seems that GM's thinking was way ahead of their time back then. Too bad some of their conceptual thinking didn't flow into the final design. ...

... I'm just amazed at how different the navigation system functionality is versus anything in the GM lineup. Honda must have different lawyers that went to different liability schools.
I agree whole heartedly about the "big brother" mentality that GM has with regard to use of the Multi-Function Display. And it certainly irritates me that I (or my passenger) can't input or change a destination while moving.

However, the GPS on my Escalade (when I'm parked) is feature-rich, intuitive, easy to use, and is head and shoulders above either Mercedes or BMW's nav system. Further, the Escalade's route-selection algorithm, while not perfect, sends me on far fewer bunny trails and weird routings than Mercedes or BMW's. It is the best thing I have ever used outside an aircraft.

...but I havent tried Acura's...:thumbs
 
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